The Churches, the Public Schools, and Moral Education: What Are Educators Thinking?

Citation: 
Bass, Dorothy C., and Elizabeth McMahon Jeep. “The Churches, the Public Schools, and Moral Education: What Are Educators Thinking?” Chicago Theological Seminary Register 79(1):30-33, Winter 1989.
Abstract: 

Dorothy Bass and Elizabeth McMahon Jeep report findings from a series of consultations, conducted by a research team from Chicago Theological Seminary, with public educators affiliated with the United Church of Christ (Illinois Conference) in preparation for the seminary’s 1988 conference on “Educating For A Public Witness.” The central questions asked of the educators include: “(1) What forces in your school or in society challenge you or cause difficulties as you seek to deal with moral issues? (2) What resources in your school or in society provide help to you as you seek to deal with [moral] issues? (3) How do you, in the daily exercise of your specific vocation, provide or support education in morality?” Among the responses given by the educators are the following: (1) teachers do act as moral educators in the classroom; (2) educator often feel a sense of burnout and lack of support; though some find help from their churches, others do not; (3) teachers find the perceived collapse of family support for a child’s moral development to be a great obstacle in education; (4) teachers do not interpret diversity in public schools to be as controlling a problem as some scholars find it; (5) the most important aspect of moral education is the behavior of the teacher as a role model; and (6) churches can help educators by strengthening the moral climate for youth, leading parents to parent better, and encourage citizen involvement in school matters.

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