Political Correctness, the Reformed Tradition, and Pluralism: Implications for Theological Education

Citation: 
Bucher, Glenn R. et al. "Political Correctness, the Reformed Tradition, and Pluralism: Implications for Theological Education," Theological Education 28, no. 2 (Spring 1992): 74-90.
Abstract: 

The title of this article was the theme for a Seminary Forum held at Columbia Theological Seminary in October 1991. Following a brief introduction by Glenn Bucher, scholars and pastors comment separately on the topic at hand. Richard Deibert emphasizes the value of a diverse community in recognizing our own limited perspective before the immense complexity of God and truth. Patricia Dutcher-Walls insists that both the biblical and Reformed traditions require that the powerless be taken seriously in seminary education and that inclusion become the norm. Yet such commitments also obligate its adherents to allow all voices to be heard, including those in opposition. Robert Franklin proposes that seminary curricula must expand to reflect the diversity of the world and the Christian church, and they must teach students the virtue of "bi-culturality," that black seminarians have always had to practice, in order to be prepared for a new wine being made by nonwhite and non-western Christians. Beverly Gaventa and George Stroup consider the educational advantages and drawbacks of inclusive language policies in theological seminaries.

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